Acquisitions and Collection Development

A Book Recommendation for National Poetry Month

Kick off National Poetry Month in April with Jill Esbaum’s Stanza, a picture book about a versifying dog.

During the day, “Stanza prowled through the streets with his two rotten brothers, annoying and chasing and bullying others.” At night he secretly writes poetry.

When his brothers discover his passion, they ridicule him—until Stanza wins a tasty prize in a poetry contest.

The description of Stanza’s efforts to create a jingle for the contest demonstrates the importance of revising work to make it as good as it can be.

He scribbled and scrawled.
Reconsidered.
Erased.
He wadded up papers.
He pondered.
He paced.
He scoured his thesaurus.
He struggled for rhymes.
He started from scratch at least eighty-two times.

This rhyming story can encourage any kind of creative endeavor, because Stanza persuades his brothers to unleash their own artistic sides. The book ends with one playing the piano and the other painting pictures.

Dee Anderson is the author of Reading Is Funny!: Motivating Kids to Read with Riddles  (ALA Editions, 2009)

Pssst! New Titles and Big Savings from ALA Editions

Our brand new Spring/Summer 2011 catalog is out now and available for your perusal.  So surf on over to the ALA Store and check out all our new and forthcoming titles.

Use a secret discount code for big savings. Spend $100 on any combination of ALA Editions products and save 10% (ALA Members, that's 20% for you!). Enter promotional code 39103 at checkout to receive your discount. Offer valid only on orders over $100 and is not valid with any other discounts except member discounts. This offer expires Tuesday, 3/8/11, so don’t delay!

Top Ten ALA Editions E-Books

ALA Editions now offers more than 300 titles in at least one e-book format, but can you guess our most popular titles? Here are our top ten bestsellers, in alphabetical order:

Bite-Sized Marketing: Realistic Solutions for the Overworked Librarian
By Nancy Dowd, Mary Evangeliste, and Jonathan Silberman
Written and designed to reflect the way people read today, this book is structured to quickly impart simple and cost-effective ideas on marketing your library.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

Cataloging Correctly for Kids: An Introduction to the Tools, Fifth Edition
Edited by Sheila S. Intner, Joanna F. Fountain, & Jean Weihs
Based on guidelines issued by the Association for Library Cataloging and Technical Services (ALCTS), this handbook is a one-stop resource for librarians who organize information for children.
ALA Store, Google eBooks

Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management, Second Edition
By Peggy Johnson
Expert instructor and librarian Peggy Johnson addresses the art in controlling and updating your library's collection.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

Gadgets and Gizmos: Personal Electronics and the Library (Library Technology Reports, April 2010, 46:3)
By Jason Griffey
Eminent blogger and library technology expert Jason Griffey provides a comprehensive guide to the present and future of modern gadgets, and how they can fit in to any librarian's plan for a high-tech future.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

Introducing RDA: A Guide to the Basics
By Chris Oliver
Resource Description and Access (RDA) is the new cataloguing standard that will replace the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR). This Special Report offers practical advice on how to make the transition.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

No Shelf Required: E-Books in Libraries
Edited by Sue Polanka
In this volume, Sue Polanka brings together a variety of professionals to share their expertise about e-books with librarians and publishers.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

The Readers' Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, Second Edition
By Joyce G. Saricks
This revised edition provides a way of understanding the vast universe of genre fiction in an easy-to-use format.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

Writing and Publishing: The Librarian's Handbook
Carol Smallwood, Editor
If you are interested in writing or reviewing for the library community, in publishing a book, or need to write and publish for tenure, then Writing and Publishing is for you.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

Writing Reviews for Readers' Advisory
By Brad Hooper
Whether the ultimate goal is writing for a library website, book club, or monthly handout, or freelancing for a newspaper, magazine, or professional journal, readers will find plenty of ideas and insight here.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

Young Adult Literature: From Romance to Realism
By Michael Cart
This survey helps YA librarians who want to freshen up their readers’ advisory skills, teachers who use novels in the classroom, and adult services librarians who increasingly find themselves addressing the queries of teen patrons.
ALA Store, Amazon Kindle, Google eBooks

How to Balance Your Library's Reading Budget

The modern librarian likely has a never-ending to-read pile, which translates into a readers’ advisory mess and an out-of-control readers' advisory budget. In our upcoming workshop Readers' Advisory: How to Balance Your Library's Reading Budget, Neal Wyatt and Joyce Saricks will offer tips that will help you clean up the mess and the budget. This workshop will offer practical tips to keep up with readers and your seemingly insurmountable to-be-read pile, saving time and money in the process. 

Topics Covered In This Workshop:

  •     How to track titles that are popular in the country and in their libraries
  •     How to gain enough information from reviews and dust jackets to discuss books with readers
  •     How reader comments, librarian comments and a range of social media can be mined to support RA work
  •     How to develop a personal plan to keep up with the weekly influx of new titles

Registration for this ALA Editions Workshop, which takes place on Thursday, Feb. 24 at 2:30 p.m. EST/1:30 p.m. CST/12:30 p.m. MST/11:30am PST, can be purchased at the ALA Store. To learn more, please view the ALA Editions Workshops Frequently Asked Questions.

Neal Wyatt is a collection development and readers’ advisory librarian from Virginia. She edits Library Journal’s “Reader’s Shelf” column and compiles the online “Wyatt’s World.” She is the editor of the Reference and User Services Quarterly’s “Alert Collector” column, contributes to NoveList and reviews for Booklist. A frequent popular speaker at ALA, PLA and regional events, she has designed and taught RUSA’s Web Continuing Education course on Readers’ Advisory Services. Her MSLS is from The Catholic University, where she formerly taught as adjunct professor.

Joyce G. Saricks worked as coordinator of the Literature and Audio Services Department at the Downers Grove (Ill.) Public Library from 1983 to 2004. In addition to authoring "Readers’ Advisory Service in the Public Library" (3rd ed., ALA, 2005), she has written numerous articles on readers’ advisory, presented workshops on that topic for public libraries and library systems and spoken at state, regional, and national library conferences. In 1989 she won the Public Library Association’s Allie Beth Martin Award, and in 2000 she was named Librarian of the Year by the Romance Writers of America. Currently she serves as read-alike coordinator (and author) for EBSCO’s NoveList and columnist and audio reviewer for Booklist. She also teaches readers’ advisory at Dominican University’s School of Library and Information Science (Ill.).

ALA Editions Workshops are designed to give you and your staff the opportunity to participate in a hands‐on learning experience that will help you make the best decisions for your library.

How to Read a Book in 10 Minutes

Jessica Moyer is the author of Research-Based Readers’ Advisory (ALA Editions, 2008) and is teaching the ALA Editions Facilitated eCourse Young Adult Readers' Advisory Services, which starts on January 17th. Registration for the course can be purchased at the ALA Store.The following guidelines, a fundamental technique of readers’ advisory, draw on the work of several forebears and as well as the appeal factors published in Joyce Saricks’ Readers Advisory Service in the Public Library, 3rd edition.

To get started grab a book you haven’t read before, by an author you don’t know, and preferably one that you don’t intend to read later. As you follow the steps below be sure to make notes.  Remember you only have 10 minutes so read and write quickly!

  •  Start with the cover. What does it tell you about the book?
    • Do the cover images look like they are aimed at a particular sex or age?
    • Is the cover image off-putting to its intended audience or obviously dated?
    • Does it give you an idea of the potential readership or genre?
    • What does the cover say about the author?  Has he/she won any awards?
    • Is the author or title in larger print?  A very large name is a good clue that this author might be a bestseller.
    • Is an unusual font or color used?  Bright red text that drips like blood would be a good indication that this is a scary book.
  • Open up the book and read the jacket blurb or the back cover:
    • What does it tell you about the book?  Is a plot summary given?  Is it directly compared to any other books?
    • What about the author?  Is a bio given or list of previous books? 
    • What do other authors think of this book?  Who are those authors?  Use these to help you start in making readalike connections
  • Flip open the book to a random page.  Check the typeface:
    • How easy is it to read?
    • Better for younger or older readers?  
    • Anything noticeable or unusual? 
    • Is more than one typeface used?
    • Are there illustrations?  Do they have captions or enhance the text?  Add to the overall story?  Are they an integral part of the story?
  • Physical characteristics
    • Heft - Can readers easily carry it?  How big and heavy is the book? 
    • Will the intended audience be willing or able to read it and carry it around?
    • Hardcover or paperback or mass market?
    • Can the book be easily opened while reading?
  • Read a sample:
    •  First chapter: what happens at the very beginning? Which characters or what setting is introduced?  How does the story start--with a description or with action?
    • Read some pages in the middle.  Are the same characters or setting still present?  What kind of events are taking place?  Is it mostly dialogue or mostly description? How much white space is on the page?
    • Read the last chapter (this is why its best to choose a book you don’t actually plan on reading).  How does it end?  Is the ending resolved?  Left wide open?  Left a little open with room for a sequel?  Is it a cliffhanger than demands a sequel?  Who is still alive/giving the final speech?
  • How does it fit into the appeal factors?
    • Pacing: How quickly are character/plot revealed? Is there more dialogue or description?  Check for white space; the more dialogue, the more white space.  Are there short sentences, short paragraphs, short chapters?  The shorter the sentences, chapters, and paragraphs, the faster it will read.  Are there multiple plotlines, flashbacks, different points of view, or does the book have a straight line plot? Is the ending open or closed?
    • Frame: Is the background detailed or minimal? How is the book supposed to make the reader feel? Is a special background integral to the story?  Is the reader assumed to have certain types of knowledge?  Either subject information essential to full understanding or previous knowledge of the world in which the story takes places (i.e. books in a series).
    • Storyline: Does the story emphasize people or events? Is the focus interior/psychological or exterior/action? What is the author’s intent? Serious versus light; comedy versus drama?
    • Characterization: Are characters fully developed or are they easily recognized types? Is focus on a single character or several who intertwine? Is characterization or characters the most important aspect of the story? Are characters developed during the series or in one book? Are there memorable or important secondary characters?
    • What’s the most important or most dominant appeal factor?
  • Other Considerations
    • Plot:  What is the book actually about?  Can you summarize the book in 30 seconds or less?  If someone asked you, “What is this book about” how would you respond?
    • Genre: Is the book part of a recognized genre? If so, which one?  What about subgenre?  Is it a genre blend?  Does the book conform to genre formulas in terms of plot or characters or does it break the rules?
    • Series:  Is it part of a series?  First in a series?  Do the other books in the series need to be read before this book or does it stand alone?  Based on the ending, how eager are readers going to be for the next one?
    • Author:  Who is the author?  What else have the author written?  Does the author usually write in this genre or is this a new direction for the writer?  Is this book a return to a genre the author hasn’t written about or in for several years?
  • Using all the information gathered in the previous sections, connect this book to other books.
    • What genre or subgenre might this book fit in?
    • What other books or authors share similar appeal factors?
    • What kind of reader might enjoy this book

Once you finish, it is a good idea to organize all your notes in a reading log or book journal or even an online book social networking site so that you not only remember your ten minute books, but have a way to look back at everything you’ve read. One way to get better is to set a goal, such as reading a book in 10 minutes once every week, or reading 5 books in a genre you don’t usually read.

Checklist – 18 Things to Do to Manage Copyright Laws in 2011

Originally posted at Lesley Ellen Harris' Website, copyrightlaws.com.

The year end is often a time to review finances, clean off desks, and get organized for the new year.  Below is a list of actions to get your copyright matters in order.

Permissions and Licenses

1. Check all licenses for electronic content to determine if any expire at the end of 2010.  Do you want to renew expiring licenses or allow them to expire?  Do you need to take any action to notify the vendor/content owner of your intention to renew or not renew a license?

2. Prepare a database of all content your organization has licensed. Whether it’s an image to use on a promotional brochure, or content from a large electronic database, include all content in a single searchable database that allows you to quickly and easily locate that content and determine what rights you have in it.

3. Generally, the duration of copyright expires at the end of each calendar year.  Determine if any of the works you want to use will be in the public domain in 2011. Review one list of works entering into the public domain on 1 January 2011.

4. Develop the “ultimate” list on what your organization needs from its license agreements. Do you need remote access or the right to share a PDF file? Do you need to make print-outs, or post articles to your intranet? What about using portions of the database for internal education/ seminars? Use the list as a set of goals in your future negotiations for licenses.

Budget

5. Consider your 2011 budget for permissions, licenses and copyright training.  Consult various people in your organization to gather their needs and preferences.  Prepare a draft budget and ensure you have the funds you need to meet your copyright needs in 2011.

Education and Training

6. Brainstorm ideas to get the copyright message to your colleagues.  How about a weekly lunchtime discussion group on copyright issues? Include senior management, marketing and information professionals, and lawyers.  Aim for a diverse group of speakers from authors to photographers to web designers to librarians.  The discussions can help “sensitize” your colleagues about copyright rather than being a lecture style format.

7. Continue your own copyright education.  Do you need a refresher course on copyright?  Or perhaps a course on international copyright or web 2.0 copyright issues?  See what in-person or online courses are being offered.

Management and Compliance

8. Develop a written copyright policy. If you do not already have one, first determine why you need one and how you would use it. If you have one, determine whether it is valuable, how you can improve or update it.

9. Do the same copyright questions arise again and again in your organization? Year end is a good time to compile these questions and prepare short practical answers.  Circulating these Qs & As to your colleagues or posting them on an intranet may help your organization better comply with copyright.

Copyright News and Information

10. Review copyright legislation in 2010 as well as court cases.  Are there any legislative amendments to your country’s Copyright Act that affect you?  Any court cases that interpret the copyright law that relate to your uses of copyright materials?

11. Try to better understand fair use/dealing. Is fair use/dealing narrow or broad? What research is covered by fair use? Create your own checklist to determine what may constitute fair use/dealing in your organization.

12. Create a list of favorite sites and books on copyright so that when you have a copyright issue in 2011, you can quickly consult reliable, helpful sources.

13. Investigate how best to follow copyright issues in 2011.  Sign up for a RSS feed?  Follow someone on Twitter?  (Try Copyrightlaws @ Twitter)  Participate on a discussion list?  There are free and subscription newsletters that may provide timely and relevant news.

Copyright Symbol and Protection

14. Review how you are protecting your own copyright works from documents to images to podcasts and videos.  Although voluntary in most countries, using the universal copyright symbol© is a reminder that copyright exists in a work.  Including contact information for permissions will direct people when obtaining copyright permissions.

15. Copyright registration is voluntary in most countries but consider registering your works with your country’s copyright office.  Rather than registering individual works, register a group or collection of works produced during the year to save time and registration fees.  Registration is important if you are distributing your works to the public and may need to enforce your rights through legal action.

16. Review your agreements with consultants. Who retains copyright ownership in consulting reports? If your organization does, make sure that this is clearly stated in your agreement and if necessary provide for an assignment of this work to your organization. If the consultant owns his works, take a look at the rights your organization has in any of the consultant’s work. If you are a consultant, review what rights you have in your own works.

17. Undergo an intellectual property or IP audit. It’s a great way to make sure all the content and computer software you are using is legal, and a great way to find out what IP you own, and how to market and better profit from that IP. This is true for individuals, small and large organizations.

18. Set up a mechanism for monitoring the legal use of your own online content on an international basis. This can be as simple as doing search engine searches, or you could hire a professional who specializes in finding unauthorized uses of content.  Piracy is not only the domain of the software and entertainment industries.  You may find surprises in how your individual or organization’s rights are being exploited, and your works used and perhaps even sold without your permission.

Click for permission to freely post this checklist on your blog, intranet or website.

Chrystie Hill on Libraries and Community

In October 2009, Chrystie Hill spoke at TEDx - Columbus expressing in a personal way her vision for libraries. As she notes, in researching for her book Inside, Outside, and Online, she spoke with library staff, thinking about their practice through a community-building lens. Across the board, she heard that librarianship is about people and connections, not the books or the services that we think people need.

Tim O’Reilly, in presenting his ideas of Government 2.0 in an Inc. article, said, “We've come to think about government as a kind of vending machine -- we put in our taxes and we get out services." He suggested that we look at government as a platform, like Apple’s iPhone, upon which 150,000 apps have been created, harnessing the entrepreneurial energy of others. What then would be the role of public libraries? Digitized music, movies, and ebooks challenge libraries’ function as a “vending machine” of physical items. Perhaps libraries’ platform is the human connection that Chrystie describes in this 20-minute video.


Chrystie Hill said that she was mad that she didn’t bring a copy of her  book to the Tedx talk.. “They didn’t tell me I could.” We’ll do better. Below is an excerpt. 
 

As a library professional, I value traditional library services and am as interested as most of my colleagues in whether library visits and overall circulation have increased. Yet, increased circulation and visits to the library, even an increase in library program or classroom attendance (especially for children’s programs), feels less of a feat against the fact that we’re not doing a good job online or outside the library. We’re absent (not entirely, but mostly) as active community builders even in our own spaces, but certainly outside the library. We’ve neglected to recognize our role as organizers and keepers of information access as primarily a social role. In fact, the scholars engaged in early discussions about the role of the library in developing and facilitating the participatory and social nature of the Web weren’t librarians, and the year was 1996.

In their seminal work “The Social Life of Documents,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid explained that documents—digital or otherwise—are much more than carriers of information. Although documents are powerful for helping us structure and organize information space, they also help us create and negotiate social space. In other words, groups form and conversations emerge around them. Brown and Duguid argued that we should expand our notion of the document to include all the social interaction that happens around it. Here they are in the late 1990s, well before Web 2.0 or prevalent Internet use, telling us that if we pay attention to how people form groups and create community around documents, it will help us move technology (and by extension, other ser¬vices) in the direction of what humans actually do with a document (Brown and Duguid 1996, 2000). In my version of the story of where we went wrong, my first point is this: we’ve neglected to consider, in general, the social life of documents, as outlined in the article. This is true for all documents, regardless of format.

A few anecdotes from some target users are instructive:

Trudee is a young professional, presently in her early twenties. She won’t ask a librarian any question, at any time, for any reason. I can ask my friends or find it myself, she says on the suggestion that she ask a reference librarian to help her solve a problem or locate information; they’re faster.

Matt is a middle manager, presently in his early thirties, who also trained as a librarian. Upon discussing whether his local library is relevant to him, he says (quite emphatically), the most important information need that I have is “what are my friends doing?” concluding then that the public library is not relevant to him as an individual user.

In the words of one OCLC survey respondent, presently in her early forties: Books, books, books, rows and rows of books, stacks of books, tables filled with books, people holding books, people checking out books. Libraries are all about books. That is what I think and that is what I will always think.

Somewhere along the way we chose (deliberately or otherwise) to value our traditional roles as much as we valued the traditional definition of the documents we cared for. If documents helped humans structure and organize information space, librarians helped humans structure, organize, and access documents. In neglecting the social nature of documents and our users, we neglected to nurture, or at least to articulate, the very social nature of our own roles.

“For what Hill (director of community services, WebJunction) offers is nothing less than a holistic vision for public libraries in the United States, centered on the library's ability to create community. She adroitly draws on scholarship and research, examples and interviews, to create a plan for libraries that is as sharply focused as it is quietly urgent.” Library Journal, starred review.

See the Google books excerpt.

Welcome to alaeditions.org!

I would like to welcome you to Editions.org and our open-forum blog. It is my privilege to be the Publisher of both TechSource (subscriptions, e-learning, webinars, and workshops) and Editions (professional and reference books, both print and electronic). My team is part of a larger unit at the American Library Association called Publishing.

The dirty little secret is that I am not a librarian, but I know a great deal about what librarians do, what they think about, and what they are concerned about.  But I never know enough; I will never be close enough to the action because I do not work in a library. So my colleagues and I depend on you tell us what is going on and what you need for your professional development. And here is a chance for you to do just that.

Something that we in publishing share with librarians of all kinds is high anxiety about how quickly our work world is changing. I am old enough (the proverbial 39, thank you Mr. Benny) to remember when the art and science of putting a book together meant having a hand-written manuscript typed by two different people (in order to ensure that the material was correct), comparing the documents, creating a master with hand edits, and sending it off to the compositor—who made galleys. (And why did we call them galleys, anyway. A galley is a long metal tray that holds type ready for printing.)

The galleys would be edited, read by the author, edited and corrected again, and sent back to the author. Changes would be made again until we finally had page proofs, which were sent back to the author and then to a proof reader. Cover art had to be hand drawn; even charts, graphs, and other display elements were hand drawn—we had an art department with lighted tables, for goodness sake.  And permission letters were a horrible bore—they took forever to do and get back. Did I forget the index……done manually? Once the art was in place and the index readied the second set of page proofs were sent off to the author. Corrections always came back, no matter how often you explained that an author could not rewrite anything! Finally, everything was sent to the printer, who put the book under the camera to make film, to make plates....and on and on.

Well, the back and forth still goes on, and we still go to the printer (for how long, one wonders). But it is all so wonderfully different now; still a lot of work for both author and publisher, but our output is more than just a physical book. It can be a PDF of the book you can print yourself; but it also can be an e-bundle that allows you to read one of our books on your Kindle or iPad or whatever your favorite device happens to be.

And of course, this is part of our shared high anxiety: Will an actual book disappear? Some may remember a quaint little movie “84 Charing Cross Road” with Anne Bancroft and Anthony Hopkins from 1986—a movie that glorified and revered not only books, but old books. In it are great scenes from the proverbial musty book shop in the basement of a London building. The staff was totally devoted to and knowledgeable about books, great ones and little volumes of seemingly no consequence other than the fact that someone wanted to own them and read them. To have them. Librarians and publishers alike are anxiously asking if patrons will continue to want and to own books. And no one knows for sure.

Now I have to confess my second dirty little secret: I have owned a Kindle for over two years, and I love it. Not only do I love it, I take it everywhere. My non-publishing friends are scandalized. But you are a book publisher. No, I respond, I am a publisher and my world has changed greatly. I want librarians to own our books, courses, and newsletters, but I don’t care if they buy an actual book or something they load on their Sony Reader. Just tell us by your buying decisions that we are publishing correctly for you. What I really want to know is if our content is helping librarians be better librarians, which is what ALA Publishing in general and TechSource and Editions in particular are all about.

So, welcome again to our blog. We want to talk about anything that has to do with books, with publishing, with libraries, with technology…..come join the party.

Michael


P.S. Many of you may have heard that Barnes & Noble is for sale. Leonard Riggio, the founder, will probably lead a group of investors and take the chain private (again). It was not long ago that the entire industry was in fear and trepidation about the power and control that the super store chains would have on the book world.  Everyone fretted that one company, with over 700 stores, would so dominate the market. They indeed did change the landscape. There are very few independent stores around. In 2001, B & N’s total market capitalization was $2.2 billion while Amazon’s capitalization was $3.6 billion.

Now the shoe is on the other foot. B & N today is capitalized at $950 million while Amazon is currently at $55 billion. Who’s the monster now…….?
 

Syndicate content